competency based grading

10 Step Primer for Competency-based Learning Design by Josie Jordan

10 Step Primer for Competency-based Learning Design by Josie Jordan

When planning curriculum, many of us were trained to rely on content resources to lead the way: What books will I cover? What textbook will I use? What concepts do I need to address? However, to be competency-based and make more room for personalization, shifting your focus to the skills learners need to build is essential. 

Use this “paint-by-numbers” guide to confidently sketch out your competency-based curriculum with bold and broad brushstrokes. It’s a simple, powerful process by which you’ll be well on your way to designing competency-based, learner-centered curriculum.  

Personalized Learning Changed Liam's Life

My Personalized Learning Experience
By Liam Corcoran

Personalized Learning Student- Liam Corcoran

In my junior year of high school I had no aspirations aside from becoming a famous rap artist. I didn’t have any fans, I didn’t have a plan and honestly, I didn’t have any skills. I had written and recorded one song when I decided my future was in music. I had been steadily getting more and more depressed for as long as I could remember and this was my only salvation. My self-esteem was at an all time low, I hated school more than ever and my frustration with the world as a whole continued to spiral. 

At seventeen, with one song under my belt, I actually had many of the trappings of a successful rapper: I was desperate, angry and insisted on going against the grain. 

That was six years ago. 

Since then, I have written and recorded over 200 songs. I worked as a supervisor at one of Vermont’s first medical cannabis dispensaries. I started a business centered around helping people overcome anxiety, boredom and loneliness. All of these opportunities stemmed directly from what I did my senior year of high school.

Looking back at where I was at seventeen, all of these accomplishments seem impossible. So what made them possible? Pathways. That was the name of the project-based, standards based personalized learning program I attended at my local high school senior year. As I reflect on my Pathways experience - now that PLPs are being implemented - I am able to identify the most important lessons I learned.

1. Confidence

I will always be grateful of how supportive my parents have been to me. The only problem is, no matter how wonderful our parents may be, the fact remains that we spend more time at school than we do at home for nine months of the year. And unfortunately, I have had very poor relationships with the majority of my teachers for as long as I can remember. 

This greatly affected the way I perceived myself. I had a tendency to do the “wrong” thing at school. My attitude was wrong. I talked at the wrong time. I did my work in the wrong way. So there was a constant voice of doubt in the back of my mind, second-guessing my every action. Over time, I internalized the voices of my teachers.

During my year of personalized learning, my confidence steadily grew. No longer were my ideas, my ways of being or my actions wrong. They were accepted by my teachers. I don’t remember one instance when someone said to me “No” when I presented them with an idea of what I wanted to do or how I wanted to do it. Instead, they often responded with “OK, how will you make that work?”. I chose what I wanted to study and how I wanted to study it. 

I began making decisions that I had never had the power to make before. Not only because I was a senior in high school, but because I was also now part of a culture that allowed me to succeed in my own way and fail in my own way. And whether it was a success or a failure, my teachers were there to congratulate me on my effort and help me learn from the experience. 

2. Creativity

Inseparable from my feelings of self-worth were my powers of creativity. From a young age, I had the notion that creativity meant the ability to produce art. This was continually reinforced throughout my schooling career. 

I know now that creativity means the ability to face problems in different ways. There are creative ways to think, speak and move through the world. 

By these standards, I was always creative. I just was never aware of my creativity. I believed that creativity was a rare gift. The truth is, humans are inherently creative. All humans. Sure, there are varying degrees of ability, but we all possess basic creativity and most importantly, the potential to become more creative. 

Currently, there is a growing awareness of the need for people to be creative because the world is rapidly changing and becoming increasingly complicated. In the context of school preparing us for life, the most prominent problem we all inevitably face is employment. At school, I had a very limited range of possibilities presented to me. It wasn’t until my experience with personalized learning that I realized I didn’t have to uncomfortably try and fit myself into one of the traditional employment boxes: business, health care, law, education, etc. I began to realize I was unique. 

During much of my life, I either felt bored or anxious because I was an individual trying to do the same thing everyone else was doing. This created a constant conflict between who I was and what I did. Personalized Learning allowed me to reconcile these two and understand that I had to create my own way of being in the world.

3. Connection

The most important experience for us when we are young (and forever afterwards) is feeling loved. This can be the love of a parent, the love of a friend or the love you have for yourself and the world around you. The more we experience love, the more our capacity to experience love grows. Love is about acceptance and belief. My personality type is hard to love in a traditional learning environment. 

I made it difficult for my teachers to accept me for who I was. I would talk to my classmates when I wasn’t supposed to be, not follow directions and question everything. Obviously, these are frustrating behaviors for someone trying to teach a classroom full of students. But these behaviors are not bad behaviors. Talking to my classmates, I’m learning social skills. Not following directions, I’m thinking for myself. Questioning everything, is inquisitive and thoughtful. 

My teachers said they believed in me, but at the same time, I didn’t feel they accepted who I was or made it possible for me to believe in myself. I used to feel a great deal of resentment towards my teachers for not treating me with respect and allowing me to follow my own path. Their task, I realize now, was near impossible. 

How can a teacher be expected to ensure the success of all of their students when they are expecting the same thing at the same time from each one? How can a teacher be expected to address behaviors when they have a whole classroom to manage? How can a teacher be expected to connect with each student and have a chance to accept and believe in each student when the student never has a chance to be themselves? 

Through my personalized learning experience, I developed relationships of trust and respect with my teachers. And my classmates. And all of the people I met in the community. And myself. I felt love more than I ever had before. My attitude toward life itself changed. I had grown to love learning, love the people around me and love myself. 

Not everyone’s experience may be as dramatic but each one is as special. Every person should have the opportunity to follow their passions, fail in their own way and experience love. We should all be empowered to find our own path.

Walking the Talk

A key step to bringing personalized and proficiency-based learning to our learners, schools, and communities is to provide targeted opportunities for professional learning. In southeastern Vermont, that’s exactly what one school district is doing. Teachers, counselors, administrators, special educators, and job-to-work coordinators from across the Two Rivers Supervisory Union (TRSU) are truly stepping into their learners’ shoes.

SchoolHack's Josie Jordan is facilitating a series of semester-long cohorts using the LiFT platform and Bray/McClaskey's, How to Personalize Learning, as the instructional texts. Designed as a graduate course through Southern New Hampshire University, TRSU follows the adage, “The ones doing the work are doing the learning.”

Participants build their own PLP’s in LiFT. They create professional and personal goals, design personalized rubrics using Job For the Future's "Educator Competencies for Personalized Learning", and then later self-assess their instructional practice. By creating their own PLP’s and responding to others' in LiFT, participants truly integrate the affective elements and relevancy of student PLP's.

TRSU educators  also work to shift their classroom culture, curriculum, and assessments to be personalized and proficiency-based. Teachers use the course time to build their proficiency-based learning modules in LiFT and then activate classes when they feel ready to implement. This course provides a unique opportunity for educators, counselors, and administrators to learn together. They have permission to experiment, receive the support and feedback of their peers, and most importantly experience hands-on practice that is actionable.

Thanks to TRSU's pioneering work, we at SchoolHack were able to see that the platform LiFT isn’t just a tool to support students’ personalized learning, but also a learning resource to implement professional learning. This type of powerful collaboration will allow us to watch the TRSU learning community blossom as they continue this innovative work.

Advancing Technology for Personalized Learning

As schools work to implement personalized learning plans for students, our new technology solution, LiFT, makes it easy for students, teachers, administrators, and parents to create effective plans.

LiFT derives from needs created by practice shifts underway at the same time policy was shifting toward a student-centered learning environment based on personalization, flexibility and proficiency. The evolving policy environment now establishes the context that requires a technology solution, a solution that LiFT provides. This technology solution can be seen in the category of learning management systems, of which there are many available. However, LiFT is uniquely different from others that are newly emerging, or older systems being retrofitted to meet new needs.  

The difference begins with the fact that LiFT is student-centered, not teacher-centered. Yet, it supports meaningful teacher/student interaction, and can be used to support teacher professional development.

It provides a rich, real-time look at individual student and class interests and reactions. It allows for parent interaction in the personalized planning process. It enables career/interest research in a way that is customizable to local needs and resources. And LiFT can serve as a repository for the body of evidence of student learning.

LOOK

The “LOOK” section encourages frequent student engagement in assessing evolving interests and reaction to instructional/learning experiences. While many platforms offer interest surveys, LiFT gathers this information on a continuing basis. And importantly, LiFT uses this information to assist students and teachers in planning the learning experience. The data generated in the “LOOK” section can also be used to inform instructional planning and teacher professional development.

LIKE

The “LIKE” section provides customized resources to support student exploration of the learning environment within and beyond the school building. Learning standards, curriculum, formative assessments, expanded learning opportunities, career exploration resources and more, may find a home in “LIKE”.

LEARN

The “LEARN” section can house a student’s personalized learning plan, in all of its richness.   Students can gather the products of their work. Teachers and students can interact, share ideas, and react to each other’s expectations. And “LEARN” can hold the evidence and documentation of student learning.

While LiFT is a response to a changing learning environment, it is also a catalyst for continuing change. It not only supports personalization and flexibility in a proficiency-based system, it also enables and encourages the transition to such a system.

 

Tom Alderman, M. Ed. | Director of Policy and Governance

Tom joins the SchoolHack team from the Vermont State Agency of Education where he most recently served as the State Director of Secondary and Adult Education. While there, Tom promoted policy supporting personalization, flexibility and proficiency-based learning. Tom played an integral role with Act 44 of 2009, Act 77 of 2013 and the revision of the Education Quality Standards in 2014. Tom also served in the Vermont House of Representatives from 1991 through 1996 as a member of the Judiciary Committee where during that time was elected to the University of Vermont Board of Trustees. "I'm pleased to be able to contribute to the continuing development and implementation of LiFT to our public education needs."

Personalized Learning Changed Liam's Life

My Personalized Learning Experience
By Liam Corcoran

In my junior year of high school I had no aspirations aside from becoming a famous rap artist. I didn’t have any fans, I didn’t have a plan and honestly, I didn’t have any skills. I had written and recorded one song when I decided my future was in music. I had been steadily getting more and more depressed for as long as I could remember and this was my only salvation. My self-esteem was at an all time low, I hated school more than ever and my frustration with the world as a whole continued to spiral. 

At seventeen, with one song under my belt, I actually had many of the trappings of a successful rapper: I was desperate, angry and insisted on going against the grain. 

That was six years ago. 

Since then, I have written and recorded over 200 songs. I worked as a supervisor at one of Vermont’s first medical cannabis dispensaries. I started a business centered around helping people overcome anxiety, boredom and loneliness. All of these opportunities stemmed directly from what I did my senior year of high school.

Looking back at where I was at seventeen, all of these accomplishments seem impossible. So what made them possible? Pathways. That was the name of the project-based, standards based personalized learning program I attended at my local high school senior year. As I reflect on my Pathways experience - now that PLPs are being implemented - I am able to identify the most important lessons I learned.

1. Confidence

I will always be grateful of how supportive my parents have been to me. The only problem is, no matter how wonderful our parents may be, the fact remains that we spend more time at school than we do at home for nine months of the year. And unfortunately, I have had very poor relationships with the majority of my teachers for as long as I can remember. 

This greatly affected the way I perceived myself. I had a tendency to do the “wrong” thing at school. My attitude was wrong. I talked at the wrong time. I did my work in the wrong way. So there was a constant voice of doubt in the back of my mind, second-guessing my every action. Over time, I internalized the voices of my teachers.

During my year of personalized learning, my confidence steadily grew. No longer were my ideas, my ways of being or my actions wrong. They were accepted by my teachers. I don’t remember one instance when someone said to me “No” when I presented them with an idea of what I wanted to do or how I wanted to do it. Instead, they often responded with “OK, how will you make that work?”. I chose what I wanted to study and how I wanted to study it. 

I began making decisions that I had never had the power to make before. Not only because I was a senior in high school, but because I was also now part of a culture that allowed me to succeed in my own way and fail in my own way. And whether it was a success or a failure, my teachers were there to congratulate me on my effort and help me learn from the experience. 

2. Creativity

Inseparable from my feelings of self-worth were my powers of creativity. From a young age, I had the notion that creativity meant the ability to produce art. This was continually reinforced throughout my schooling career. 

I know now that creativity means the ability to face problems in different ways. There are creative ways to think, speak and move through the world. 

By these standards, I was always creative. I just was never aware of my creativity. I believed that creativity was a rare gift. The truth is, humans are inherently creative. All humans. Sure, there are varying degrees of ability, but we all possess basic creativity and most importantly, the potential to become more creative. 

Currently, there is a growing awareness of the need for people to be creative because the world is rapidly changing and becoming increasingly complicated. In the context of school preparing us for life, the most prominent problem we all inevitably face is employment. At school, I had a very limited range of possibilities presented to me. It wasn’t until my experience with personalized learning that I realized I didn’t have to uncomfortably try and fit myself into one of the traditional employment boxes: business, health care, law, education, etc. I began to realize I was unique. 

During much of my life, I either felt bored or anxious because I was an individual trying to do the same thing everyone else was doing. This created a constant conflict between who I was and what I did. Personalized Learning allowed me to reconcile these two and understand that I had to create my own way of being in the world.

3. Connection

The most important experience for us when we are young (and forever afterwards) is feeling loved. This can be the love of a parent, the love of a friend or the love you have for yourself and the world around you. The more we experience love, the more our capacity to experience love grows. Love is about acceptance and belief. My personality type is hard to love in a traditional learning environment. 

I made it difficult for my teachers to accept me for who I was. I would talk to my classmates when I wasn’t supposed to be, not follow directions and question everything. Obviously, these are frustrating behaviors for someone trying to teach a classroom full of students. But these behaviors are not bad behaviors. Talking to my classmates, I’m learning social skills. Not following directions, I’m thinking for myself. Questioning everything, is inquisitive and thoughtful. 

My teachers said they believed in me, but at the same time, I didn’t feel they accepted who I was or made it possible for me to believe in myself. I used to feel a great deal of resentment towards my teachers for not treating me with respect and allowing me to follow my own path. Their task, I realize now, was near impossible. 

How can a teacher be expected to ensure the success of all of their students when they are expecting the same thing at the same time from each one? How can a teacher be expected to address behaviors when they have a whole classroom to manage? How can a teacher be expected to connect with each student and have a chance to accept and believe in each student when the student never has a chance to be themselves? 

Through my personalized learning experience, I developed relationships of trust and respect with my teachers. And my classmates. And all of the people I met in the community. And myself. I felt love more than I ever had before. My attitude toward life itself changed. I had grown to love learning, love the people around me and love myself. 

Not everyone’s experience may be as dramatic but each one is as special. Every person should have the opportunity to follow their passions, fail in their own way and experience love. We should all be empowered to find our own path.